25

Jan

Reading Together

Today’s Reading Together is a long one! There were too many good ones I didn’t want to leave any in the dark.

And before I start the list… thought I’d share this article from the Washington Post on how to choose books for kids and teens.

What resources do you use to pick out books for kids and/or teens? Whether they be your own, for family, a classroom, or library patrons?

I’d like to know!

On to the list:

Do You Know Which Ones Will Grow? by Susan A. Shea, illustrations by Tom Slaughter

A duckling grows and becomes a duck, so can a car grow into a truck? This is such a clever fold-out book about things that grow up and things that do not.

There Are Cats in This Book by Viviane Schwarz

We love this book. We read it multiple times in one sitting. A co-worker brought it to my attention a couple weeks ago and I had never seen it before then. Another fun flap book I’m hoping to introduce to my storytimers this spring.

My Name is Elizabeth by Annika Dunklee, illustrated by Matthew Forsythe

A book about nicknames and a desire for a lack thereof.  Refrain from “Beth” or “Lizzie”, Elizabeth likes her name just the way it is.

If Your Hoppy by April Pulley Sayre, illustrations by Jackie Urbanovic

Read to the tune, “If you’re happy and you know it”, this books is a silly story about animal actions. A good pick for toddlers and pre-schoolers.

Melvin and the Boy by Lauren Castillo

I’m a fan of Lauren Castillo. Her illustration style is both beautiful and visually appealing to kids. This is her first book as both author and illustrator (and hopefully not her last!).

A Cat Like That by Wendy Wahman

Bright colors. About cats. Automatic seal of approval by L.

Mine! by Shutta Crum, illustrations by Patrice Barton

Parents and caretakers are very familiar with the word, “mine” once kids reach a certain age. You can view the trailer for this book here.

Say What? by Angela DiTerlizzi, illustrated by Joey Chou

A book about animal noises is also always a clear win in our house. And this one especially. When we read it, L says what an animal says at animal volume.

Train Trip by Deanna Caswell, illustrated by Dan Andreasen

I looked back to see if I’ve done this one yet. Have I? We’ve checked it out multiple times. Oh, well…

Follow Me by Tricia Tusa

Love Tricia Tusa. This is a sweet story about daydreaming.

Good Boy, Fergus! by David Shannon

Fergus is very cute and very lovable but far from the most well behaved dog.

My mom owns a westie. His name is Renfro.

Refro and Fergus are a lot a like.

Mitchell’s License by Hallie Durand, illustrated by Tony Fucile

I’ll be reading this one for Father’s Day storytime. It’s about a father’s struggle to put his son, Mitchell, to bed until he comes up with Mitchell’s “Remote-Control Dad Driver’s License”.

Chew, Chew, Gulp by Lauren Thompson, illustrated by Jarrett J. Kroscoczka

L really likes reading this book and she especially likes to point out the different foods.

And yell their names.

“Juuuu!”

(Juice)

“GreeBee!”

(Green Beans)

Petunia by Roger Duvoisin

Petunia is an old girl! Her birthday dates back to 1950. The story is a little long for L to sit through, but we like to look through the pictures. A good age to start reading this book would be around 4 or 5.

Cornelius P. Mud Are You Ready For Bed? by Barney Saltzberg

Such a cute book to read before bedtime. Especially, for those that like to procrastinate going to bed… so I guess that would mean all kids. And me…

All in a Day by Cynthia Rylant, illustrated by Nikki McClure

Cynthia Rylant is a household name in children’s books producing Newbery medal book Missing May and popular books like the Henry and Mudge series for early readers. Cut-paper illustrator Nikki McClure’s To Market, To Market, published last year is also a great book to put on your check out list.

Doodleday by Ross Collins

My sister-in-law is a kindergarten teacher and the mother of three kids aged three and under, so I always love to hear about what books she’s been reading and Doodleday was one of them. Thanks Sarah!





***’Reading Together is a sampling of picture books I’m currently reading aloud to LBD (also known as L or Little L), my toddler daughter. As a children’s librarian, I’m always bringing home stacks and stacks of books to share together. Old and new. These are our favorites. Some of which have been read over and over and over again…. Times thirty. To the tenth power.***

image sources: which ones will grow, cats in this book, my name is elizabeth, if your hoppy, melvin and the boy, cat like thatmine, say what, train trip, follow me, good boy fergus, mitchell’s license, chew chew gulp, petunia, cornelius p. mudd, all in a day, doodleday

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8 Responses to “Reading Together”

  1. Elizabeth says:

    I have “My Name is Elizabeth”! (of course). I love it…even though I don’t mind being called Liz now and again. Also, Lauren Castillo went through the MFA program I’m in now! Woot. Go SVA.

    • Rebecca says:

      After college, people would call me Rebecca at work and I just continued to go by Rebecca. I don’t mind being called Becca either…
      On a completely different note, I had a crazy dream about high school swimming last night. Coach kicked me off the team. Woke up in a fuzzy state and have been in a weird mood all day because of it!

  2. Shutta Crum says:

    Thanks for including MINE! in this wonderful list! The artwork by Patrice Barton is soooo wonderful. She really portrays each child so beautifully you can practically read their minds. (www.shutta.com)

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